Tag Archives: french cuisine

Sage

This is embarrassing. I’d assumed we’d written on all of our favorite eateries in Tallahassee. How could we have missed Sage, a restaurant that’s easily in the top three? This is the same Sage that someone reportedly broke into and set ablaze, closed for nearly a year, and re-opened better than ever. Though I liked the french diner setup they had before the fire, their new digs are tre’ cool.

Sara and Alison, getting ready to throw back some snails for breakfast.

We had an opportunity to go for Sunday brunch with some friends this past week after our tubing trip got rained out. It doesn’t open until 11am on Sunday, and by the time we got there a sizable crowd had gathered. I pushed a couple older individuals to the ground and got to the front of the line. As we were being seated, the waitress apologized: they were still printing the menus for that day. Cool.

Sunny side up egg over slow cooked pork belly with sweet potato and bacon hash, side of fried whole okra. Forgetaboutit!

Sage’s menu is predominantly french cuisine: crepes, croque monsieur, duck terrine and escargot are all regulars. Besides the extensive menu, our waitress rattled off at least three specials. I was pining for bacon and boy did I get it: braised pork belly with sweet potato-bacon hash and fried whole okra.*

Eggs benedict with seasonal vegetables.

Sara got the eggs benedict equivalent and Allison got my second choice: brined, roasted turkey breast  with brie cheese and a fruit preserve on a croissant. We took a passing interest in the dessert menu but the bay leaf ice cream with orange biscotti caught my attention. If you’ve not had bay leaf ice cream, it’s really, really good.

Chuck begging for food.

Everyone else seemed to like their food as well. I should mention Sara and I have eaten at Sage once before together and several times on our own with friends. The food there is really on par with the best in the city. They have a creative menu, are very reasonably priced, and never disappoint.

*Special thanks to Mike Bonfanti for use of the word pining. The man’s vocabulary knows no bounds.

-Abe

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